Category Archives: knowledge

Hair today not gone tomorrow

How hair has shaped my life.

by James Arthur Warren 6th of January 2015

“Hair, flow it, show it, long as God can grow my hair”  These are the lyrics to the theme song in Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical written in the 60’s. My parents saw the musical Hair when it came to Australia in the year I was born, 1970. I was conceived in 1969, the Summer of Love and I am a product of the counter-culture hippie generation. I love playing the record as in my teenage years and the whole idea of the ‘dawning of the age of Aquarius resonated deeply within my soul. I am an Aquarian, a water carrier.

As a young child I had the typical long hair of a 1970’s child with a straight cut fringe and golden blond hair. I was called “Jamie” at the time and combined with my “pretty face and long hair resulted in some people saying’ “what a pretty little girl” These people just weren’t ready to see long haired boy.

As a thirteen year old I thought it would be cool to copy my idol at the time, Tim Finn from the band Split Enz. Off I went to the hairdresser got the sides cut short and the top permed. WTF was I thinking. The result was not acceptance as I had hoped but ostracism. It started when a famous athlete, also my idol had just returned from competing in America and he brought back to Australia a new word, “Fagot”. The nickname fagot stuck around for 5 years until I left the small minded people to expand my mind at University. To this day I am grateful for this experience as it was character building. It gave me empathy for oppressed and bullied people regardless of their sexual orientation.

Studying a Bachelor of Science in Australian Environmental studies at Griffith Uni I was surrounded by like minded hippies and grew my hair long, golden and brown. I felt at ease with long hair and this was a part of my life where I grew not only my hair, but my love of reggae music and my love of the planet Gaia.

Nearing the end of my studies I cut my hair off in the most confronting way. I shaved it bald for a number of reasons. First, so I didn’t have to use chemical shampoos or conditioners. Second, because I didn’t want to be stereotyped as a “long haired hippie” I just wanted people to get to know me and to know what is inside my head not on my head. It didn’t work. Again people tend to generalize and if they didn’t think I was a Buddhist monk they were scared or frightened because I could have been a Nazi Skinhead.

For twenty two years I continued to run the clippers over my head every 28 days on the new moon. That was the whole extent of my hair maintenance. No shampoo, no conditioner, no chemical colours, no perms, no brushing, no worries.

It was my love of reggae music from my long hair days that lead to me growing my hair today. Rastafarians don’t cut their hair and let it mat up into dreadlocks.  In 2013 I competed with team “Adventjah Cirkus” in the Sunshine Coast Tough Mudder. During training, I resolved that I would grow my hair if I completed it.

Using chemical shampoos and conditioners is out. The perfume make me gag and the chemical soapy taste in my mouth disgusts me. Now, once a week its a bicarbonate soda wash and an apple cider vinegar condition. A hair brush hasn’t touched my head in months, I’ve lost it and my hair has finally started knotting in one or two small dreads. There is a long way to go but nothing happens overnight.

For me being a rastafarian is not about being part of any religion, it’s a way of life where I live my spiritual truth. Rastafari locks are symbolic of the Lion of Judah and my family crest carries the words “”Leo de Juda est robur nostrum”, the lion of Judah is our strength.

In the ancient Vedic texts “The long-haired one endures fire, the long-haired one endures poison, the long-haired one endures both worlds. The long-haired one is said to gaze full on heaven, the long-haired one is said to be that light “ [1]  The god Shiva is sometimes depicted with dreadlocks Dreads are also found in Tibetan Buddhism as a way to transcend material vanity and excessive attachments. [2] Yes dreadlocks are common in many spiritual traditions.

My father arrived at dinner with a haircut saying I love short hair. We started discussing hair when my mother said “I’ve told you 4 times to cut your hair” I replied ’Look what happened to Samson when he cut his hair for Delilah, he lost his strength”

199217_1009305083670_3667_n  She replied in frustration, “Jesus Christ.” Somehow I recall seeing Him depicted with long hair and a beard too. Have you noticed how many beards are around these days? That’s a whole other essay.

I want to know who decided hairless legs, arm pits and genitals make a woman more beautiful or clean? Some of the most beautiful women I know have hairy pits legs and possibly genitals, and they are beautiful because they have the strength of conviction to grow their hair against the tide of material vanity and excessive attachment.

“Hair, flow it, show it, long as God can grow my hair”

[1] The Keshin Hymn, Rig-veda 10.136

{2} B Bogin The Dreadlocks Treatise: On Tantric Hairstyles in Tibetan Buddhism.

Riding with the Atlantean

by James Arthur Warren 3 January 2015

There are as many different ways to get an education as there are ways to get to and from  school.

Learning from your family: Back in the 1980’s my father was a teacher at my Maroochydore State High School where I was a student. So the safe way to get my education was seated next to my father in his car. It was easy, comfortable, safe and got me to school on time, and dry when it was raining. It cost me nothing. It was free but it was my dad’s way.

Learning from your school: There was also a double decker bus. It was blue and it stopped opposite my home and picked up the neighbours and my two sisters. Sometimes I would take the double decker bus to school. It was easy, organised and safe if you weren’t being bullied. The blue double decker school bus got me to school on time (it took 20 minutes) and it cost us nothing because we lived just far enough from the school to get our transport paid for by the government. It was free but it was the government’s standard way.

Teaching yourself: Being the eldest child and wanting my freedom I instead chose to ride my bicycle to school. I didn’t want to sit on a boring bus wasting my time when I could be free to go as fast or slow as I wanted, I could weave, jump and stop to smoke a sneaky ciggie on the way. It was only 3km to school, I got there on time. There was a bicycle path which made it relatively safe. One day I had to jump my bike over a red bellied black snake on the path but that was the most dangerous thing that ever happened. Riding my bike cost nothing, I made a few mistakes on the way, like stopping for those ciggies but I learned from them. It was free and it was my standard way.

Exploring new possibilities: One time I discovered a new way. What I did was dangerous and I don’t condone it. I came out of school with my bicycle one afternoon just as the blue double decker school buses were leaving. The road from school had a good downhill slope and the big old double decker school buses took a while to gain speed. As I mounted my bike, a bus pulled along side me. I pedaled fast to keep up with the bus, students inside were yelling at me with excitement to go faster. I pedaled hard and then saw I could grab hold of a grate on the side. I reached out and held the bus with one hand and started to be towed by the bus. We reached about 55km/h, stopped for the traffic lights and then continued. All the while I was being cheered on by student’s inside. I got halfway home before letting go and using my own power. That day I got home very quickly, safely too. My parents got a call from the school because the bus driver had reported me and I got in trouble. It was free but by using the best of the old standard ways I created a new way.

Catching the double decker bus with my bicycle was my new way. It shows there are many ways to learn and they don’t have to be the standard way of the crowd. Sometimes you have to take a risk, combine the best of your knowledge to achieve a better outcome. The result will be a better way.

James’ Blue House Free School is exploring a new way

On 27 of November 2014 a supercell storm blew the roof off my home of 8 years and left myself and 3 sons displaced. I am an Environmental Scientist and English as a Second Language teacher. I have taught thousands of refugees and migrant to read and write English and settle in Australia. I understand the importance of reading and writing to having access to information so that you can improve your life and the lives of those around you.

So I am selling everything I don’t need to fund James’ Blue House Free School Bus so that I can take a travelling school into areas where access to education is limited. All the money raised will go to purchasing a 1972 Leyland Atlantean double decker bus and equipping it with computers and solar energy generation.

The initial goal is to raise $20,000 of donations on gofundme James’ Blue House Free School Bus

Read more about the Blue House Free School Blog  https://bluehousefreeschool.wordpress.com/

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15 Quotes about education from Master Teachers

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Education of myself is both liberating and addictive. Liberating because it frees me from the bonds of ignorance. Addictive because the more that I know, the more I more I learn what I don’t know yet.

I know what I do know.  I know that what I don’t know, I can learn. However, it’s what I don’t that I don’t know that I can only learn through study, self mastery and education. I realized this many years ago, fortunately, when I was young and then the amazing Internet came along and suddenly I increased my learning ability because of the availability of information  and this inspired me to learn more. For this reason I’ve put together a few of my favourite quotes about education from some of the Master Teachers of the past.  Continue reading 15 Quotes about education from Master Teachers